What exactly is a node in AllStarLink

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.

A node is an internet connection identifier (a number). It has no more than one public IP associated with it, but one public IP number can have multiple node numbers when using port forwarding in a NAT router. Node numbers for public access are assigned by Allstarlink, whereas a private node is unassigned, and must be numerically less than 2000 and not registered in AllstarLink by the node

A node can have no radio (known as a hub and other nodes can connect (link) to it over the internet as a central connection point), or one radio (a repeater). Since private nodes are not registered, a connecting node at a different IP address must be told (hard coded in its config file), how to locate it. A node can have SIP access (a hub or repeater), as in using an internet connected VoIP phone to control (using DTMF commands) or use the node to connect to and interface with other nodes by linking them together using DTMF commands (ie from a iPhone using Zoiper, or iaxRpt on an android phone or computer that is internet connected).

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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Not sure what you mean by:

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

My available radio port hardware I don’t think I mentioned but I have a 4 port pci radio interface card I traded Jim Dixon for long ago that has never been used and I have probably 20-30 ARIB boards that I got around the same time. That said I’m not sure what port hardware i have is important, more so that each port is a channel in asterisk and how each channel relates to the concept of a node. I’m most familiar with remote radio systems based upon the Sierra radio systems (SRS) controller which may have up to 8 ports (channels) of audio connected and any port may be connected to any other port in a cross point matrix. The general configuration is usually a remote (not remote base) full duplex radio that acts like a repeater, a number of full duplex links to other sites, and possibly a frequency agile remote base on one or more bands. Each site/controller has a prefix that is unique to that site for controlling functions at that site, the prefix I would take to be similar to a node number. In many ways I’d like to have my node(s) able to emulate this behavior (mostly for compatibility reasons) and I’m looking at how this might be done.

Eric

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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Eric:

You mention you have a computer with four radio ports… what are those? I am not familiar with “radio ports” on a computer. Perhaps just replying with the make and model number would help us identify what they are.

Tim

···

=================================

Tim Govin

K7TPG

+1.435.655.1520

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:32 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Not sure what you mean by:

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

My available radio port hardware I don’t think I mentioned but I have a 4 port pci radio interface card I traded Jim Dixon for long ago that has never been used and I have probably 20-30 ARIB boards that I got around the same time. That said I’m not sure what port hardware i have is important, more so that each port is a channel in asterisk and how each channel relates to the concept of a node. I’m most familiar with remote radio systems based upon the Sierra radio systems (SRS) controller which may have up to 8 ports (channels) of audio connected and any port may be connected to any other port in a cross point matrix. The general configuration is usually a remote (not remote base) full duplex radio that acts like a repeater, a number of full duplex links to other sites, and possibly a frequency agile remote base on one or more bands. Each site/controller has a prefix that is unique to that site for controlling functions at that site, the prefix I would take to be similar to a node number. In many ways I’d like to have my node(s) able to emulate this behavior (mostly for compatibility reasons) and I’m looking at how this might be done.

Eric

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,

Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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Sent using SMTP.

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 11:13 AM, K7TPG K7TPG@protonmail.com wrote:

Eric:

You mention you have a computer with four radio ports… what are those? I am not familiar with “radio ports” on a computer. Perhaps just replying with the make and model number would help us identify what they are.

Tim

=================================

Tim Govin

K7TPG

+1.435.655.1520

See my previous answer to k6ecm and the list included below for hardware specifics. Honestly l don’t see why the hardware matters for the context of the original question (what exactly is a node?). Call the ports channels if you like, I don’t see why it matters. At least as I understand it every node in the AllStarLink system that has radio ports is a computer of some sort with radio ports. The hardware that provides those ports I consider to be an integral part of that computer system as without them that computer system would be incapable of connecting to radio hardware. Weather one is using some usb dongle, an fxo port and arib board Jim Dixon designed and had me build a bunch of for a project he was doing, the 4 port pci radio card Jim designed and had a bunch built, or the Dmk engineering interfaces, to asterisk they are just simply channels as are sip, iax, EchoLink, IRLP, DSTAR, etc. let’s not confound the specific hardware being used here as relating to the original question (what exactly is a node?) the interfaces shouldn’t matter as a node at least as I am coming to understand it simply has one or more channels that interface with asterisk.

Eric

Af6ep

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:32 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Not sure what you mean by:

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

My available radio port hardware I don’t think I mentioned but I have a 4 port pci radio interface card I traded Jim Dixon for long ago that has never been used and I have probably 20-30 ARIB boards that I got around the same time. That said I’m not sure what port hardware i have is important, more so that each port is a channel in asterisk and how each channel relates to the concept of a node. I’m most familiar with remote radio systems based upon the Sierra radio systems (SRS) controller which may have up to 8 ports (channels) of audio connected and any port may be connected to any other port in a cross point matrix. The general configuration is usually a remote (not remote base) full duplex radio that acts like a repeater, a number of full duplex links to other sites, and possibly a frequency agile remote base on one or more bands. Each site/controller has a prefix that is unique to that site for controlling functions at that site, the prefix I would take to be similar to a node number. In many ways I’d like to have my node(s) able to emulate this behavior (mostly for compatibility reasons) and I’m looking at how this might be done.

Eric

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,

Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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I believe what some forget that there was/is an Asterisk interface https://www.digium.com/products/telephony-cards/analog prior to all of us hopping on the Allstar Wagon with the App-Rpt module which Jim Dixon provided for us. Most of us Hams use some form of the C-Media Sound cards as our interface from Radio to Computer rather than the Digium Computer Cards which are mainly used for Asterisk and PBX.

Eric, Simply Allstar NODES have RF Radio Interface capabilities that PURE Asterisk does not.

My take from your question is, what you run is probably pure Asterisk Hardware/Software. Allstar nodes are still Asterisk driven but use an older modified/patched version which includes additional modules that have the capability to control RF Radio and Repeater hardware along with integrating their audio to and from a computer and eventually Asterisk. "Node" more than likely comes from the way we utilize Allstar.

I am no document writer or Guru. Maybe some one will give a more detailed answer.

Hope that helps.

Larry - N7FM

···

On 3/16/19 12:24 AM, Eric Fort wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.
_______________________________________________
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Ok so after reading some more of the responses maybe I need to differentiate between a node and node number. A node (or possibly node number, I’m not sure at this point) had been described as an internet connection identifier. We have hardware, a computer of some sort running Linux with appropriate hardware interfaces to allow radio interfacing, and some software that I thought was asterisk and app_rpt and this manages a bunch of channels that can be interconnected in various ways. A computer can apparently run one or more nodes and or at least have multiple node numbers assigned to it. Now let’s say I have a computer with 5 radios attached (say 2 repeaters, 2 link radios, a frequency agile remote base radio), along with channels for echolink, IRLP, sip, iax, pots, etc. when I connect to this “node” er dial a node number what do I connect to? Maybe some of the confusion here is use of proper nomenclature. Is a node and node number one in the same? Does it have to be? When I dial a node number what actually happens under the hood? How does the node number get translated and routed to where it needs to go and whatever one is requesting a connection to? Is an allstar node number handled as an extension on the computer/PBX/er node ( what’s the proper wording here?) via extensions.conf? Maybe some examples of how people are implementing setups that have more than a single radio (maybe an Hf remote base like an ft-897, a repeater, connections to echolink, irlp, iax, sip, dstar, dmr, pots, etc) are being done. These at least at one time were simply channel drivers and handled in extensions.conf as to how things happened. Has this changed? What and how are node numbers handled under the hood?

Thanks,

Eric

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

A node is an internet connection identifier (a number). It has no more than one public IP associated with it, but one public IP number can have multiple node numbers when using port forwarding in a NAT router. Node numbers for public access are assigned by Allstarlink, whereas a private node is unassigned, and must be numerically less than 2000 and not registered in AllstarLink by the node

A node can have no radio (known as a hub and other nodes can connect (link) to it over the internet as a central connection point), or one radio (a repeater). Since private nodes are not registered, a connecting node at a different IP address must be told (hard coded in its config file), how to locate it. A node can have SIP access (a hub or repeater), as in using an internet connected VoIP phone to control (using DTMF commands) or use the node to connect to and interface with other nodes by linking them together using DTMF commands (ie from a iPhone using Zoiper, or iaxRpt on an android phone or computer that is internet connected).

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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All connections are peer-to-peer. This is facilitated by an Allstarlink server sending a file to each computer hosting a node or nodes a list of all registered nodes ( read that as identifying number), an IP address, and a UDP port number (bindport=xxxx in iax.conf).

When a connection (link) takes place, the host computer uses the information in the app_rpt config files associated with each node (number) to process communications and control of the repeater, or what ever you are controlling. EchoLink, SIP, and iax are supported. IRLP is not.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 8:53 PM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Ok so after reading some more of the responses maybe I need to differentiate between a node and node number. A node (or possibly node number, I’m not sure at this point) had been described as an internet connection identifier. We have hardware, a computer of some sort running Linux with appropriate hardware interfaces to allow radio interfacing, and some software that I thought was asterisk and app_rpt and this manages a bunch of channels that can be interconnected in various ways. A computer can apparently run one or more nodes and or at least have multiple node numbers assigned to it. Now let’s say I have a computer with 5 radios attached (say 2 repeaters, 2 link radios, a frequency agile remote base radio), along with channels for echolink, IRLP, sip, iax, pots, etc. when I connect to this “node” er dial a node number what do I connect to? Maybe some of the confusion here is use of proper nomenclature. Is a node and node number one in the same? Does it have to be? When I dial a node number what actually happens under the hood? How does the node number get translated and routed to where it needs to go and whatever one is requesting a connection to? Is an allstar node number handled as an extension on the computer/PBX/er node ( what’s the proper wording here?) via extensions.conf? Maybe some examples of how people are implementing setups that have more than a single radio (maybe an Hf remote base like an ft-897, a repeater, connections to echolink, irlp, iax, sip, dstar, dmr, pots, etc) are being done. These at least at one time were simply channel drivers and handled in extensions.conf as to how things happened. Has this changed? What and how are node numbers handled under the hood?

Thanks,

Eric

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

A node is an internet connection identifier (a number). It has no more than one public IP associated with it, but one public IP number can have multiple node numbers when using port forwarding in a NAT router. Node numbers for public access are assigned by Allstarlink, whereas a private node is unassigned, and must be numerically less than 2000 and not registered in AllstarLink by the node

A node can have no radio (known as a hub and other nodes can connect (link) to it over the internet as a central connection point), or one radio (a repeater). Since private nodes are not registered, a connecting node at a different IP address must be told (hard coded in its config file), how to locate it. A node can have SIP access (a hub or repeater), as in using an internet connected VoIP phone to control (using DTMF commands) or use the node to connect to and interface with other nodes by linking them together using DTMF commands (ie from a iPhone using Zoiper, or iaxRpt on an android phone or computer that is internet connected).

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 9:22 PM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

All connections are peer-to-peer. This is facilitated by an Allstarlink server sending a file

What is an AllStarLink server? Is this another computer on the network with radios attached, or is it a computer maintained by the allstar node numbering authority that periodically uploads a config file to my hardware so my hardware knows how to reach other nodes?

to each computer hosting a node or nodes a list of all registered nodes ( read that as identifying number), an IP address, and a UDP port number (bindport=xxxx in iax.conf).

When a connection (link) takes place, the host computer uses the information in the app_rpt config files associated with each node (number) to process communications and control of the repeater, or what ever you are controlling. EchoLink, SIP, and iax are supported. IRLP is not.

Ok so where can I find the docs for app_rpt? Let’s say I have a computer with a repeater and a remote base attached (physically connected over wire with analog signaling) locally. If I dial into that node am I connected to the remote base, the repeater, both, neither, some dialplan logic that plays abandon-all-hope… followed by tt-weasels, or something else? How is this decided?

Eric

Af6ep

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

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On Mar 16, 2019, at 8:53 PM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Ok so after reading some more of the responses maybe I need to differentiate between a node and node number. A node (or possibly node number, I’m not sure at this point) had been described as an internet connection identifier. We have hardware, a computer of some sort running Linux with appropriate hardware interfaces to allow radio interfacing, and some software that I thought was asterisk and app_rpt and this manages a bunch of channels that can be interconnected in various ways. A computer can apparently run one or more nodes and or at least have multiple node numbers assigned to it. Now let’s say I have a computer with 5 radios attached (say 2 repeaters, 2 link radios, a frequency agile remote base radio), along with channels for echolink, IRLP, sip, iax, pots, etc. when I connect to this “node” er dial a node number what do I connect to? Maybe some of the confusion here is use of proper nomenclature. Is a node and node number one in the same? Does it have to be? When I dial a node number what actually happens under the hood? How does the node number get translated and routed to where it needs to go and whatever one is requesting a connection to? Is an allstar node number handled as an extension on the computer/PBX/er node ( what’s the proper wording here?) via extensions.conf? Maybe some examples of how people are implementing setups that have more than a single radio (maybe an Hf remote base like an ft-897, a repeater, connections to echolink, irlp, iax, sip, dstar, dmr, pots, etc) are being done. These at least at one time were simply channel drivers and handled in extensions.conf as to how things happened. Has this changed? What and how are node numbers handled under the hood?

Thanks,

Eric

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

A node is an internet connection identifier (a number). It has no more than one public IP associated with it, but one public IP number can have multiple node numbers when using port forwarding in a NAT router. Node numbers for public access are assigned by Allstarlink, whereas a private node is unassigned, and must be numerically less than 2000 and not registered in AllstarLink by the node

A node can have no radio (known as a hub and other nodes can connect (link) to it over the internet as a central connection point), or one radio (a repeater). Since private nodes are not registered, a connecting node at a different IP address must be told (hard coded in its config file), how to locate it. A node can have SIP access (a hub or repeater), as in using an internet connected VoIP phone to control (using DTMF commands) or use the node to connect to and interface with other nodes by linking them together using DTMF commands (ie from a iPhone using Zoiper, or iaxRpt on an android phone or computer that is internet connected).

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 9:22 PM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

All connections are peer-to-peer. This is facilitated by an Allstarlink server sending a file to each computer hosting a node or nodes a list of all registered nodes ( read that as identifying number), an IP address, and a UDP port number (bindport=xxxx in iax.conf).

When a connection (link) takes place, the host computer uses the information in the app_rpt config files associated with each node (number) to process communications and control of the repeater, or what ever you are controlling. EchoLink, SIP, and iax are supported. IRLP is not.

IRLP not supported? What happened to chan_irlp? Here’s a mailing list reference to it from Steve Rodgers:

http://lists.allstarlink.org/pipermail/app_rpt-users/2009-May/001016.html

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad


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On Mar 16, 2019, at 8:53 PM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Ok so after reading some more of the responses maybe I need to differentiate between a node and node number. A node (or possibly node number, I’m not sure at this point) had been described as an internet connection identifier. We have hardware, a computer of some sort running Linux with appropriate hardware interfaces to allow radio interfacing, and some software that I thought was asterisk and app_rpt and this manages a bunch of channels that can be interconnected in various ways. A computer can apparently run one or more nodes and or at least have multiple node numbers assigned to it. Now let’s say I have a computer with 5 radios attached (say 2 repeaters, 2 link radios, a frequency agile remote base radio), along with channels for echolink, IRLP, sip, iax, pots, etc. when I connect to this “node” er dial a node number what do I connect to? Maybe some of the confusion here is use of proper nomenclature. Is a node and node number one in the same? Does it have to be? When I dial a node number what actually happens under the hood? How does the node number get translated and routed to where it needs to go and whatever one is requesting a connection to? Is an allstar node number handled as an extension on the computer/PBX/er node ( what’s the proper wording here?) via extensions.conf? Maybe some examples of how people are implementing setups that have more than a single radio (maybe an Hf remote base like an ft-897, a repeater, connections to echolink, irlp, iax, sip, dstar, dmr, pots, etc) are being done. These at least at one time were simply channel drivers and handled in extensions.conf as to how things happened. Has this changed? What and how are node numbers handled under the hood?

Thanks,

Eric

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.

On Mar 16, 2019, at 3:12 AM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

A node is an internet connection identifier (a number). It has no more than one public IP associated with it, but one public IP number can have multiple node numbers when using port forwarding in a NAT router. Node numbers for public access are assigned by Allstarlink, whereas a private node is unassigned, and must be numerically less than 2000 and not registered in AllstarLink by the node

A node can have no radio (known as a hub and other nodes can connect (link) to it over the internet as a central connection point), or one radio (a repeater). Since private nodes are not registered, a connecting node at a different IP address must be told (hard coded in its config file), how to locate it. A node can have SIP access (a hub or repeater), as in using an internet connected VoIP phone to control (using DTMF commands) or use the node to connect to and interface with other nodes by linking them together using DTMF commands (ie from a iPhone using Zoiper, or iaxRpt on an android phone or computer that is internet connected).

I do not recognize your port types, but AllstarLink software is designed to interface with specific interface hardware such as the DMk engineering URIx, or any number of modified USB audio interfaces based on the CM119 chip family.

See https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Hope this helps.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

Sent from iPad

On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:24 AM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.


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See below…

Thanks,
Bob

What is an AllStarLink server? a computer maintained by the allstar node numbering authority that periodically uploads a config file to my hardware so my hardware knows how to reach other nodes?

Ok so where can I find the docs for app_rpt?

https://allstarlink.org/

https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

Let’s say I have a computer with a repeater and a remote base attached (physically connected over wire with analog signaling) locally. If I dial into that node am I connected to the remote base, the repeater, both, neither, some dialplan logic that plays abandon-all-hope… followed by tt-weasels, or something else? How is this decided?

Links occur between nodes. A different node number is assigned to each radio or repeater. Allstarlink nodes are assigned to you on request, and you make the application. Private nodes are your own choosing (see earlier response).

The owners of IRLP asked to no longer be included in Allstarlink, so it was removed from the app_rpt code some years ago by Jim.

Thanks,
Bob

K6ECM

···

On Mar 16, 2019, at 10:20 PM, Eric Fort eric.fort.listmail@fortconsulting.org wrote:

Sent using SMTP.

On Mar 16, 2019, at 9:22 PM, Bob Pyke k6ecm1@gmail.com wrote:

All connections are peer-to-peer. This is facilitated by an Allstarlink server sending a file to each computer hosting a node or nodes a list of all registered nodes ( read that as identifying number), an IP address, and a UDP port number (bindport=xxxx in iax.conf).

When a connection (link) takes place, the host computer uses the information in the app_rpt config files associated with each node (number) to process communications and control of the repeater, or what ever you are controlling. EchoLink, SIP, and iax are supported. IRLP is not.

IRLP not supported? What happened to chan_irlp? Here’s a mailing list reference to it from Steve Rodgers:

http://lists.allstarlink.org/pipermail/app_rpt-users/2009-May/001016.html

Eric,

To answer your question on "How does Allstarlink prevent loops in routing"

When you make a connection on Allstarlink from one node to another, there is backend telemetry data that is sent form the node being connected and the node making the connection request.

The node being connected to sends telemetry data information to the node making the connection with a list of the nodes already connected, if it detects another connection from an already connected node it will not let the connection be made.

Marshall - ke6pcv

···

-----Original Message-----
From: App_rpt-users [mailto:app_rpt-users-bounces@lists.allstarlink.org] On Behalf Of Eric Fort
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 12:25 AM
To: app_rpt-users@lists.allstarlink.org
Subject: [App_rpt-users] What exactly is a node in AllStarLink

Could someone help me get a better idea of the concept of what a node is in asterisk/app_rpt/all star terminology. I have a computer with 4 radio ports, an fxo port, an fxs port, and an Internet connection which allows connection to any number of endpoints over sip or iax. Now what is a node? I’d like to be able via DTMF to bring one or more radios on and off link. Some of my understanding that needs to happen here is how AllStarLink is architected but also relating concepts to what I know and am familiar with which is a network of linked remotes (anyone here a cactus member or at least familiar with how a srs controller is architected as an 8x8 full duplex audio switch matrix. ) where a remote may have up to 8 radios and each of those can be linked or unlinked individually to any one or more of the other 8. Finally, how does AllStarLink prevent loops in routing? I know this seems odd at first glance but I can easily foresee audio from one source being linked to multiple places and those sources being mixed and linked back in a twisted mess. Please help me to understand

Af6ep

Sent using SMTP.
_______________________________________________
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An ASL server is the computer hardware or virtualization that
contains Asterisk and app_rpt. One or many nodes can be configured
in/on one server.
When someone signs up for an AllStarLink account, they are vetted
(verified as a valid amateur radio operator) and their status is set
to standard user. They can, at any subsequent time, log-in to the
AllStar Portal and change themselves to a system operator. The
difference is a standard user doesn’t maintain hardware, they are
simply a vetted user. A system operator is a vetted user that is
intending to operate at least one publicly available server and one
node. The system operator can have as many servers and nodes
configured under AllStarLink as they want - for free. Asterisk and app_rpt can also be run privately. Servers then do not
register publicly to AllStarLink, however they can register to other
private peers by setting up parameters in a look-up table we call
the “phone book”. Node numbers 2000 and above are registered
publicly, where nodes 1999 and below are not registered publicly.
AllStarLink runs the master public registration server system
keeping track of servers that want to publicly register and
advertise their availability to the world of AllStar. A private
system of Asterisk and app_rpt (servers and nodes) doesn’t require
anything from AllStarlink, as they don’t keep track of private
systems. To understand how AllStarLink works, we first have to understand
Asterisk and how it’s intended to operate. Asterisk is a software
PBX (public branch exchange). A PBX is a traditional business phone
system where many “extensions” connect to one box. Sally at
extension 1000 can call Johnny at extension 1004 by simply dialing
the extension number. She can also dial any public exchange if the
PBX has a SIP trunk or POTS telephone line(s) connected to it for
calling “outside” of the business. So if the server box has a
Internet connection (and other required stuff), extensions can make
and receive telephone calls to the outside world as well as other
extensions directly connected.
AllStarLink nodes can be thought of as extension phones in the
traditional business phone system. In your example above, the repeater and remote base would be two
independent nodes. They could connect to nothing (be stand alone),
one connected to something else and one stand alone, connect to each
other, both connected together and then to something else, or
individually connected to something else.
Unlike a standard repeater controller, the cross-point switch
configuration in AllStarLink is unlimited. You are free to dial
(connect) any node to any other node. You can connect a node in
listen only or monitor mode. This allows you to hear traffic from
another node or system of nodes, but your locally generated voice
traffic is not conveyed to the other system (microphone muted on
this extension).
By the ASL registration server system and what nodes you decide to
connect where.
Kevin Custer W3KKC

···

On 3/17/2019 1:15 AM, Eric Fort wrote:

    What is an

AllStarLink server?

Ok so where can I find the docs for app_rpt?

https://web-tpa.allstarlink.org/
https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page

    Let’s say I have a computer with a repeater and a remote

base attached (physically connected over wire with analog
signaling) locally. If I dial into that node am I connected to
the remote base, the repeater, both, neither, some dialplan
logic that plays abandon-all-hope… followed by tt-weasels, or
something else?

How is this decided?

Thanks,

So a node is an extension addressed by a node number that could be any function or series of functions executable by the asterisk dialplan. Normally this would be connect me to abcxyz which corespondent to a hardware port or conference bridge on a server somewhere, but could just as well be setup to play tt-weasels, trigger a relay at the site, and/or send or read an email with AGI and dialplan scripting. Is this correct?

Eric

Sent using SMTP.

···

On Mar 17, 2019, at 6:06 AM, Kevin Custer kuggie@kuggie.com wrote:

On 3/17/2019 1:15 AM, Eric Fort wrote:

    What is an

AllStarLink server?

An ASL server is the computer hardware or virtualization that

contains Asterisk and app_rpt. One or many nodes can be configured
in/on one server.

When someone signs up for an AllStarLink account, they are vetted

(verified as a valid amateur radio operator) and their status is set
to standard user. They can, at any subsequent time, log-in to the
AllStar Portal and change themselves to a system operator. The
difference is a standard user doesn’t maintain hardware, they are
simply a vetted user. A system operator is a vetted user that is
intending to operate at least one publicly available server and one
node. The system operator can have as many servers and nodes
configured under AllStarLink as they want - for free.

Asterisk and app_rpt can also be run privately.  Servers then do not

register publicly to AllStarLink, however they can register to other
private peers by setting up parameters in a look-up table we call
the “phone book”. Node numbers 2000 and above are registered
publicly, where nodes 1999 and below are not registered publicly.
AllStarLink runs the master public registration server system
keeping track of servers that want to publicly register and
advertise their availability to the world of AllStar. A private
system of Asterisk and app_rpt (servers and nodes) doesn’t require
anything from AllStarlink, as they don’t keep track of private
systems.

To understand how AllStarLink works, we first have to understand

Asterisk and how it’s intended to operate. Asterisk is a software
PBX (public branch exchange). A PBX is a traditional business phone
system where many “extensions” connect to one box. Sally at
extension 1000 can call Johnny at extension 1004 by simply dialing
the extension number. She can also dial any public exchange if the
PBX has a SIP trunk or POTS telephone line(s) connected to it for
calling “outside” of the business. So if the server box has a
Internet connection (and other required stuff), extensions can make
and receive telephone calls to the outside world as well as other
extensions directly connected.

AllStarLink nodes can be thought of as extension phones in the

traditional business phone system.

Ok so where can I find the docs for app_rpt?

[https://web-tpa.allstarlink.org/](https://web-tpa.allstarlink.org/)

[https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page](https://wiki.allstarlink.org/wiki/Main_Page)
    Let’s say I have a computer with a repeater and a remote

base attached (physically connected over wire with analog
signaling) locally. If I dial into that node am I connected to
the remote base, the repeater, both, neither, some dialplan
logic that plays abandon-all-hope… followed by tt-weasels, or
something else?

In your example above, the repeater and remote base would be two

independent nodes. They could connect to nothing (be stand alone),
one connected to something else and one stand alone, connect to each
other, both connected together and then to something else, or
individually connected to something else.

Unlike a standard repeater controller, the cross-point switch

configuration in AllStarLink is unlimited. You are free to dial
(connect) any node to any other node. You can connect a node in
listen only or monitor mode. This allows you to hear traffic from
another node or system of nodes, but your locally generated voice
traffic is not conveyed to the other system (microphone muted on
this extension).

How is this decided?

By the ASL registration server system and what nodes you decide to

connect where.

Kevin Custer W3KKC

The new portal (web-tpa.allstarlink.org) does not differentiate between sysops and vetted users. The sysop concept has been depreciated as it was a difference without a distinction. Any vetted user can perform what used to be sysop functions on the new portal.

You've received a lot of good info thus far. Allow me to try to answer your
latest:

So a node is an extension addressed by a node number that
could be any function or series of functions executable by
the asterisk dialplan.

A simplified way to look at it is extensions and dialplans as related only
to establishing the *connections* between nodes. The *functions* that are
available on a given node are mostly unrelated to that, and are defined
elsewhere. Perhaps that's where some of your confusion lies?

A node number and an extension number are equal - it's a unique identifier
for an endpoint. As Kevin said, node numbers can either be "public",
whereby they are published via AllstarLink so that all other nodes can
connect to them without having a static entry mapping node number to IP
address/port in their local "phone book", or they can be private, with the
node number, IP address, and port shared only among those node
owners/operators in that private group. This is akin to a listed versus
unlisted telephone number.

In a PBX, an extension might be associated with an analog port to which a
regular desk phone is connected, whereas in ASL, it is usually associated
with an interface for a single radio, whether that radio is a repeater, a
simplex or duplex auxiliary link radio, a simplex radio, a receive-only
radio, a transmit-only radio, a frequency-agile remote base, or whatever.

Additionally, you can have a radio-less node, which simply behaves as a
"hub" for other nodes to connect to (i.e. a conference bridge). By default,
all nodes also act as hubs in the sense that multiple remote nodes can
connect to a given node at the same time, i.e. you don't need to create or
use a radio-less node to act as a hub. However, many larger systems do
operate a separate radio-less hub as it allows the hub server to be put in a
data center or other secure location with backup power and fast/reliable
connectivity.

A given node (which has its own unique node number) has associated with it a
list of functions that are available on that node. They are defined, along
with many other things, in the configuration file rpt.conf. In rpt.conf,
you create a mapping of your own codes to the desired Asterisk/app_rpt
function . I think if you look through the default rpt.conf or other
examples on the net it may start to make more sense. For example, you might
create code 6789 and map it to the control operator function which disables
the repeater (cop,3).

Functions codes that you create are are normally accessed over-the-air via
DTMF, but can also be called by scripts, the Asterisk command line
interface, triggered remotely from another node, etc.. They can also be
called through the event management subsystem to accomplish things like
"when node 4444 connects to my node, play this message", or "when the
transmitter is first keyed up, set GPIO output #3 high which turns on the
fan".

You can also create macros that execute a series of functions sequentially,
and those macros can be called just like any other function (i.e. via DTMF,
via CLI, etc.).

but could just as well be setup
to play tt-weasels, trigger a relay at the site, and/or send
or read an email with AGI and dialplan scripting. Is this correct?

Aside from the functionality built into app_rpt, you can create functions
that do some of the other things you suggest by having that function call a
shell script to do whatever you want to do outside of Asterisk.

I think that many of your questions will answer themselves once you do an
installation, look at the config files, and start playing with it.

        --- Jeff WN3A

···

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Just diving in. Thanks for the excellent information.

James - WQ7H

James,

Welcome, you’re in for a fun journey, getting started with AllStar.

Post back if you have any questions. Be sure to check out our main site and our WiKi documentation, if you haven’t already.